双语阅读 | 关灯玩手机可能加速视力下降

关灯玩手机可能加速视力下降Using Your Smartphone in the Dark Risks Speeding up Vision Loss王淑怡 供稿A 22-year-old woman in England thought she was going blind in one eye. She could always see fine out of her left eye. But on some nights, the right eye failed her. All she could see out of it were vague shapes in the room. At first, it happened about two or three times a week. Then it started happening every night. When she went to the doctor, her vision appeared normal. So did brain scans. But it was a disturbing trend. Around the same time, another woman noticed the same thing. On some mornings, she'd lose vision in just one eye for up to 20 minutes.英国的一名22岁女性觉得自己的一只眼睛就要失明。她的左眼正常,但在某些晚上,右眼只能看到房间里模糊的影子。起初,这种情况大约每周发生两三次,然后开始每晚都会发生。但是,每次等到她去看医生时,视力又恢复了正常,脑部扫描结果也并无异常。几乎在同一时段,另一名女性也称自己遭遇了同样的事情。在某些清晨,她的一只眼睛会出现短暂失明,有时长达20分钟。 Vision loss in one eye can be a sign that a person is having a small stroke, which is why one of the women was put on bloodthinnersand the other got a brain scan. But after further investigation, researchers think the problem is much simpler. They're calling the affliction"transient smartphone 'blindness.' "一只眼睛失明可能是中风的前兆,因此,其中一名女性在治疗时被注射了血液稀释剂,另一名则做了脑部扫描。不过,经过进一步检查后,研究人员认为问题的原因并不复杂,她们只是患上了“暂时性手机致盲症”。"Both women typically looked at their smartphones with only one eye while resting on their side in bed in the dark —their other eye was covered by the pillow," says Gordon Plant, an ophthalmologistat Moorfields Eye Hospital in London. "So you have one eye adapted to the light because it's looking at the phone and the other eye is adapted to the dark."When they put their phone down, they couldn't see with the phone eye. That's because it's taking many minutes to catch up to the other eye that's adapted to the dark.伦敦穆尔菲尔兹眼科医院的戈登·普兰特医生说:“这两位女士在关灯玩手机时,经常侧躺在床上,一只眼睛盯着手机,而另一只眼则埋在枕头里。这样一来,盯手机的那只眼睛要适应光亮,而埋在枕头里的另一只眼睛要适应黑暗。”当她们放下手机时,盯手机的那只眼睛需要几分钟时间才能重新适应黑暗,因此出现了暂时看不见的症状。New research is detailing how blue light, which emits from smartphone and laptop screens, can damage your retinal cells, and possibly lead to maculardegeneration, an eye disease that causes vision loss.High levels of looking at a phone or tablet is linked with around a 30 percent higher risk ofshort-sightedness, also known as myopia. But when it is combined with excessive computer use, that risk rose to around 80 percent.一项新的研究表明,手机和电脑屏幕发出的蓝光会损害视网膜细胞,并可能导致黄斑变性,从而造成视力下降。长时间盯着手机或平板电脑会使患近视的风险增加约30%。但如果再加上过度使用电脑,这种风险将上升到80%左右。So, how can weprotect ourselves? Unfortunately, blue light can be hard to avoid. It can come from sunlight and from our smartphones and PCs. But the researchers say that people should be careful about using their electronics devices in the dark. Doing so can focus the blue light directly into your eyes. People can also consider wearing glasses that's designed tofilter outblue light. In the meantime, researchers areexploring whether an eye drop solution can be developed to counter theseeffects.那么,我们应该保护自己的双眼呢?不幸的是,蓝光很难避免。它可以来自阳光,也可以来自我们的手机和电脑。但研究人员表示,人们应尽量不要在黑暗中使用电子设备,这么做会使蓝光直接聚焦到眼睛里。也可以考虑佩戴一副防蓝光眼镜。同时,研究人员正在探索能否开发出一种滴眼液来缓解这种症状。【VOCABULARY】1.bloodthinner血液稀释剂2.afflictionn.折磨人的事物3.ophthalmologistn.眼科医生4.macularn.(眼球)黄斑的5.degenerationn. 恶化,衰退,堕落6.short-sightednessn. 近视7.myopian.近视;目光短浅,缺乏远见8.filter out过滤掉;不予注意;泄露9.eyedrop滴眼剂(封面图片来源于摄图网,版权归摄图网所有)

双语阅读 | 为什么社交媒体让人情绪低落

为什么社交媒体让人情绪低落Why Social Media Causes Depression王淑怡 供稿A study published in Depression and Anxiety found that social media users are more likely to be depressed. But how does social media make you depressed when spending time on social media can be a fun way to pass time? Well, here are a few reasons and what you can do about it.《抑郁与焦虑》杂志的一项研究发现,社交媒体用户更容易抑郁。社交媒体本来是一个很有趣的打发时间的方式,为什么它会让人如此不开心呢?以下是社交媒体使人情绪低落的原因,以及我们该如何应对。Social media encourages social comparison社交媒体会引发社交攀比There have been many studies linking social media to depression. A study in the Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology shows we feel depressed because we’re comparing our own lives to others’ highlight reels. Most people like to portray an idealized image of their lives, personal traits, and appearance on sites like Facebook and Instagram. If you confuse this idealized image with reality, you may be under the false impression that everyone is better than you which can crush your self-esteem and lead to depression. This is especially true for teens and young adults who are more likely to compare themselves to others. If you already suffer from low self-esteem, the illusion that everyone has it better off than you will just make you feel worse.许多研究显示,使用社交媒体容易让人抑郁。《社会与临床心理学》杂志中的一项研究表明,我们之所以会感到抑郁,是因为我们总是拿自己的日常和他人的高光时刻做比较。大多数人喜欢在Facebook和Instagram等平台描绘自己生活、个人特征和外表的理想化形象,如果你混淆了这种理想化的形象和现实,你可能会产生一种错误的印象,认为每个人都比你优秀,这会摧毁你的自尊,导致抑郁。这对青少年和年轻人来说尤其如此,他们更有可能将自己与他人进行比较。如果你已经饱受自卑之苦,那种认为每个人都比你过得更好的错觉只会让你感觉更糟。Social media may lead to information bombarding社交媒体会带来信息轰炸Picture this: you're between Zoom meetings, and scrolling through your social media newsfeed. Headlines like "Death toll continues to rise", "COVID-19 may cause long-term health implications" and "Health-care systems overwhelmed" flash across your screen. Your mood takes a dive, but you can't stop scrolling. Seeing these constant reminders causes you to feel more depressed than before. Research suggest that people have a tendency to seek out information during uncertain times and exposure to negative news is likely to be detrimental to our emotional wellbeing. For instance, one study conducted in March 2020 involving more than 6,000 Americans found that the more time participants spent consuming COVID news in a day, the unhappier they felt.想象一下,你刚开完一个视频会议,趁着空闲翻阅一下社交媒体的推送新闻。屏幕上闪过的标题都是“死亡率继续上升”、“新冠病毒可能会对健康产生长期危害”、“医疗系统不堪重负”之类的。你的心情骤然间变得低落,但是你仍忍不住继续翻阅,看着不间断的消息提醒,你更焦虑了。研究表明,人们在充满不确定性的时期往往都会去寻找信息,而负面新闻不利于精神健康。例如,2020年3月开展的一项涵盖了6000多名美国人的研究发现,参与者在一天内用于浏览疫情新闻的时间越多,他们就越不开心。So, what can we do to build a healthy relationship with social media?所以,我们应该怎么做,才能和社交媒体建立良性健康的关系呢?Spend real, meaningful time with your friends. Instead of trying to amass friends on social media, a best cure for depression might be spending time with those you're closest to.多花点时间陪陪真正的朋友。与其试图在社交媒体上广交朋友,不如花点时间和最亲密的人在一起,这可能是避免情绪低落的最好方法。Seek out content that makes you happy to balance out your newsfeed. This may be images of cute kittens, beautiful landscapes, drool-worthy food videos or something else. You could even follow a social media account dedicated to sharing only happy and positive news.查阅推送信息时多看那些让你开心的内容,比如可爱的小猫、美丽的风景、令人垂涎欲滴的美食视频,甚至可以关注一个专门分享快乐积极新闻的社交媒体用户。Consider removing apps from your phone. If it’s hard for you to limit or adjust the amount of time you spend on social media, consider deleting your apps from your phone. This’ll help to prevent that mindless scrolling you do at work, at the dinner table, and so on.考虑从手机中删除某些社交软件。如果你做不到减少浏览社交媒体的时间,可以考虑直接从手机上删除这些社交软件。这将有助于避免你在工作时或在就餐等场合下意识地刷手机。【VOCABULARY】1.highlight reel 高能时刻,高光时刻2.crush v. 破坏,毁坏(某人的信心或幸福)3.self-esteem 自尊心4.scroll v. 滚屏,滚动5.take a dive 暴跌6.amass v. (尤指大量)积累,积聚7.newsfeed n. 新闻供应8.drool-worthy adj. 令人垂涎欲滴的(封面图片来源于摄图网,版权归摄图网所有)

双语阅读 | 如何实现新年目标

如何实现新年目标How to make your New Year’s resolutions happen王淑怡 供稿Every year, millions of people make New Year’s resolutions, hoping to sparkpositive change. The recurringthemes each year include a more active approach to health and fitness, improved finances, and learning new skills.Despite the best of intentions, many people struggle to finishtheir plans. According to statistics published by the University of Scranton, about 45 percent of Americans usually make New Year's resolutions. However, of those who make resolutions,a mere 8 percent achieve them.每年,许多人都会制定自己的新年目标,希望在新的一年中做出积极改变。认真锻炼、保持健康、存钱、学习新技能……这几个主题年年都会在我们的计划中重复出现。虽然愿望很美好,但很多人的计划都会以失败告终。美国斯克兰顿大学的调查数据表明,大约45%的人会制定新年目标,但只有8%的人能够实现。According to research, the most common reasons people struggle to keep their resolutions include not being specific enough, notmentally preparedfor change, and lackofresolution. If you want to realize your New Year’s resolution this year, trythefollowing2 steps:研究显示,人们常见的无法实现新年目标的原因包括:目标不够具体、还没有准备好接受改变以及缺乏实现目标的动力。如果今年你想要认真完成新年目标,可以尝试以下两个方法:1.Write down your goals withSMART principlesfor the areas in your life you are committed to changing.1.用SMART原则在你希望做出改变的领域制定目标Specific. Your resolution should be clear. Rather than saying, “I want to start exercising,” we would say, “I want to start exercising 20 minutes a day, three times a week.”S代表具体(Specific),你的目标必须具体清晰。比如“我想要开始锻炼”不够具体,可以说“我想要每天锻炼20分钟,一周锻炼三次”。Measurable. Ensure that you benchmarkyour progress. This will help with your motivation and allow you to see the progress you have made so far.M代表可度量(Measurable),确保你能够衡量目标完成的情况,这有助于提升你的积极性,并且能够直观地看到目前为止所取得的成就。Achievable. Even the loftiestgoals can be accomplished ifyoumakeefforts. Try to avoid set goals that are out of you reach.A代表可实现(Achievable),即使是最难以完成的目标,在付出努力的情况下目标依然可以实现,尽量避免设立你无法达到的目标。Relevant. Why is this important to you now? Is this goal relevant in your life right now? Relevance is particularly important when setting professional goals. R代表相关性(Relevant),为什么现阶段这个目标对你很重要?这个目标是否与你现在的生活相关?相关性在制定职业规划时尤为重要。Time-bound means setting a specific deadline for accomplishment. A deadline creates a sense of urgency to motivate us to act.T代表有时限(Time-bound),指要为完成目标设定一个具体的时间期限,给自己制造一种紧迫性,从而激励自己完成目标。2.Make it fun2.找些乐趣Most of us strive for efficiency when it comes to achieving our goals. If you want to get fit, you figure a punishing workout will be just the thing to produce rapid progress. If you want to acea class, you assume long, distraction-free study sessions are key. But research has shown that focusing on efficiency can leave you high and dry because you'll neglect an even more important part of the equation: whether you enjoy the act of goal pursuit.在完成目标的过程中,大多数人都力求高效。如果你的目标是锻炼身体,你会认为高强度的锻炼将能让你快速取得成效。如果你想学好一门功课,你会认为长时间、不被打扰的学习很重要。但研究表明,专注于效率会让你被困在原地,因为你会忽略更重要的事,也就是你是否享受追求目标的过程。If it's not fun to exercise or study, you're unlikely to keep at it. But if you get pleasure from your workouts or study sessions, research has found you'll persist longer. And in the end, that's what often matters most to achieving a New Year's resolution.如果锻炼或学习没有乐趣,你就不太可能坚持下去。但研究发现如果你从锻炼或学习中获得乐趣,就会坚持得更久。而最终,这往往是实现新年计划的最重要因素。One way to make pursuing a goal that normally feels like a choremore fun is to combine it with a guilty pleasure. Consider only letting yourself watch your favorite TV show at the gym so you'll start looking forward to workouts. Or only letting yourself drink a coffee during study sessions so there is a hook to get you to the library. 想要把追求一个辛苦的目标变得更有趣,方法就是把它与有罪恶感的快乐结合起来。可能仅仅允许自己在健身房看最喜欢的电视节目,你就会开始期待锻炼了。或者让自己在学习期间喝咖啡,这样就有了去图书馆的动力。【VOCABULARY】1.sparkv.引发2.recurringadj.反复出现的,再次发生的3.benchmarkv.(根据某种标准)评估,衡量4.loftyadj.(思想、目标等)崇高的;高尚的5.time-boundadj. 有时限的6.acev.在……中取得好成绩7.equationn.(必须考虑多种因素的)复杂局面(或问题)8.choren. 令人厌烦的任务;乏味无聊的工作(封面图片来源于摄图网,版权归摄图网所有)

练习 | 如何成为一个有趣的人?

如何成为一个有趣的人?How to Be Interesting?刘立军 供稿TRANSCRIPTMany of us crave to be more interesting people. The question is: how might we become so?We rightly tend to associate being ‘interesting’ with achieving difference from the norm: with being able to serve up some unusual and intriguing stories and ideas. But what might be the best way to lay our hands on these?One prestigious thesis tells us that we should try our best to root out new and well-reviewed books and articles, travel to remote places and be friend people who are prominent in the arts and business.This correctly latches on to something - that we should aim to be different - but it entirely overlooks that, before we’ve ever read a single book, gone to any foreign country or met any Nobel Prize laureates, we are all compellingly different anyway. The problem is that we just don’t allow ourselves to come across as such.To get a taste for this pre-existing level of originality, imagine if we placed a microphone in any of our minds and listened closely in on the chatter.We would quickly find the most surprising, and authentically gripping information: we’d realise that we were attracted to some very unexpected people, often just the sort we weren’t supposed to have any feelings for. We’d realise that we had some hilariously personal (and shocking) takes on politics and society - and that we didn’t agree with most of the standard lines proposed to us by the media. Our anxieties, fears, hopes and excitements would show a properly distinctive and captivating pattern.We are - though we try so hard never to admit this to ourselves, let alone anyone else - already a real character.We understand this point in relation to children. Every child under seven is fascinating. They almost never do anything interesting in the outside world, but it’s the honest, uncensored way in which they report on their inner lives that guarantees their interest. When they chit-chat about their granny or their teacher or their take on their dad, we’re open-mouthed.We were once fascinating, too, before we got overly worried about seeming normal.There are of course some things we should - as we grow up - take care not to mention to spare others hurt, but a lot fewer than we think. When we next fear coming across as dull, we need only lean in more closely on the data from our deep selves: we should, and the habit may require a little conscious effort to develop, get in touch with what we actually believe. What emerges may sound odd, but it is also liable to be hugely charming, warm-hearted and comforting - and a lot closer to what people around the table deep down feel too than what was printed in today’s newspaper.Everyone is interesting. So-called interesting people are simply those who’ve allowed themselves to listen in on and share with others a selection of what is really going on in their minds.They have not allowed self-hatred and self-suspicion to block them from disclosing their reality. They have been confident enough to imagine that the truth about themselves could be a pleasure for others to hear - and, with a few obvious caveats, it almost certainly will be.VOCABULARY1. crave v. to have a very strong desire for sth. 渴望;热望。例如:She has always craved excitement. 她总渴望刺激。2. prestigious adj. respected and admired as very important or of very high quality 有威望的;声誉高的。例如:a prestigious award 赫赫有名的奖项3. latch on (to sb. / sth.): to develop a strong interest in sth. 对……产生浓厚的兴趣。例如:She always latches on to the latest craze. 她总是对最新时尚有浓厚的兴趣。4. laureate n. a person who has been given an official honour or prize for sth. important they have achieved 荣誉获得者;获奖者。例如:a Nobel laureate 诺贝尔奖获得者5. captivating adj. taking all your attention; very attractive and interesting 迷人的;有魅力的;有吸引力的。(同义词)enchanting 例如:He found her captivating. 他发觉她很迷人。6. chit-chat n. (informal) conversation about things that are not important 闲聊;聊天;闲谈。(同义词)chat7. caveat n. (formal, from Latin) a warning that particular things need to be considered before sth. can be done 警告;告诫QUESTIONSRead the statements. Then listen to the news and decide whether the statements are true (T) or false (F). Then correct the false statements.1. All of us crave to be more interesting people.2. One prestigious thesis tells us that we should try our best to root out new and well-reviewed books and articles, travel to remote places and befriend people who are prominent in the arts and science.3. To get a taste for this pre-existing level of originality, imagine if we placed a mobilephone in any of our minds and listened closely in on the chatter.4. Every child under eight is fascinating.5. We were once fascinating, too, after we got overly worried about seeming normal.6. So-called interesting people are simply those who’ve allowed themselves to listen in on and share with others a selection of what is really going on in their minds.KEYRead the statements. Then listen to the news and decide whether the statements are true (T) or false (F). Then correct the false statements.(F) 1. All of us crave to be more interesting people.(正确表达)Many of us crave to be more interesting people.(F) 2. One prestigious thesis tells us that we should try our best to root out new and well-reviewed books and articles, travel to remote places and befriend people who are prominent in the arts and science.(正确表达)One prestigious thesis tells us that we should try our best to root out new and well-reviewed books and articles, travel to remote places and befriend people who are prominent in the arts and business.(F) 3. To get a taste for this pre-existing level of originality, imagine if we placed a mobilephone in any of our minds and listened closely in on the chatter.(正确表达)To get a taste for this pre-existing level of originality, imagine if we placed a microphone in any of our minds and listened closely in on the chatter.(F) 4. Every child under eight is fascinating.(正确表达)Every child under seven is fascinating.(F) 5. We were once fascinating, too, after we got overly worried about seeming normal.(正确表达)We were once fascinating, too, before we got overly worried about seeming normal.(T) 6. So-called interesting people are simply those who’ve allowed themselves to listen in on and share with others a selection of what is really going on in their minds.(封面图片来源于摄图网,版权归摄图网所有)

练习 | 欧美多国通货膨胀

欧美多国通货膨胀Inflation in many western countries刘立军 供稿TRANSCRIPTThe world this week - BusinessThe yields on short-term American bonds rose significantly, an indicator that markets are expecting hefty interest-rate rises from the Federal Reserve.Pressure on bond yields was felt globally.Japan’s central bank offered to buy an unlimited amount of government bonds, an intervention designed to protect its 0.25% cap on Japan’s ten-year yield.Yields on two-year American Treasury notes briefly rose above those on the ten-year note for the first time since 2019 (government bonds with longer terms usually offer higher yields).Such an inversion of the yield curve is often taken as a sign that a recession is on the cards.Consumers in Britain borrowed an extra net £1.5bn (that’s $2bn) on credit cards in February, the highest monthly figure since records began in 1993.The data suggest that with inflation at a 30-year high, people are taking on more debt to maintain household spending as prices increase.Andrew Bailey, the governor of the Bank of England, warned this week that consumers face a “historic shock” to their incomes because of inflation, fuelled mostly by energy prices.Germany’s annual inflation rate is expected to come in at 7.3% for March, according to the country’s statistics office, the highest rate since German reunification in 1990.Inflation in Spain surged to 9.8%, the highest in that country for almost 40 years.HP said it would buy Poly, which makes devices for video-conference communications, in a transaction valued at $3.3bn.The computer-maker said the deal would bolster its business in hybrid working.It reckons that 75% of office workers are investing in improvements to their home office set-ups; revenue in the “office meeting room solutions” industry is expected to triple by 2024.The co-chief executive of SK Hynix, a South Korean chipmaker, said his company was interested in buying Arm through an investment consortium.Nvidia’s proposed $60bn acquisition of the British chip designer collapsed recently because of competition concerns.SK Hynix stressed that it does not yet have a specific plan to take over Arm.Tesla announced its intention to split its stock, though it didn’t say when and what the ratio would be.The electric-car maker has split its stock before, in 2020, when shareholders were given five new shares (so reduced in value by four-fifths) for every one they owned.Stock splits are intended to drum up interest from investors who might be put off by the high price of a company’s shares.Alphabet and Amazon both recently laid out plans for 20-1 stock splits.VOCABULARY1. bond n. an agreement by a government or a company to pay you interest on the money you have lent; a document containing this agreement 债券;公债2.intervention n. 干预; 调解3.inversion n. the act of changing the position or order of sth. to its opposite, or of turning sth. upside down 倒置;颠倒。例如:the inversion of normal word order 正常词序的倒装4. on the cards: (British English) (also North American English in the cards) (informal) likely to happen 可能发生的;可能的。例如:The merger has been on the cards for some time now. 合并的事情已经酝酿了一段时间。5.the Treasury (单数名词 +单数/复数动词) (in Britain, the US and some other countries) the government department that controls public money(英国、美国和其他一些国家的)财政部6.bolster v. to improve sth. or make it stronger 改善;加强7. hybrid n. something that is the product of mixing two or more different things (不同事物的)混合物,合成物QUESTIONSRead the statements. Then listen to the news and decide whether the statements are true (T) or false (F). Then correct the false statements.1. Pressure on bond yields was felt locally.2. Japan’s central bank offered to buy a limited amount of government bonds.3. Such an inversion of the yield curve is often taken as a sign that a recession is on the cards.4. Andrew Bailey is the next governor of the Bank of England.5. Germany’s annual inflation rate is expected to come in at 7.8% for March.6. Inflation in Spain surged to 9.8%, the highest in that country for almost 40 years.7. Nvidia’s proposed $66bn acquisition of the British chip designer collapsed recently because of competition concerns.8. Tesla announced its intention to split its stock, though it didn’t say when and what the ratio would be.KEYRead the statements. Then listen to the news and decide whether the statements are true (T) or false (F). Then correct the false statements.(F)1. Pressure on bond yields was felt locally.(正确表达)Pressure on bond yields was felt globally.(F) 2. Japan’s central bank offered to buy a limited amount of government bonds.(正确表达)Japan’s central bank offered to buy an unlimited amount of government bonds.(T) 3. Such an inversion of the yield curve is often taken as a sign that a recession is on the cards.(F)4. Andrew Bailey is the next governor of the Bank of England.(正确表达)Andrew Bailey is the governor of the Bank of England.(F) 5. Germany’s annual inflation rate is expected to come in at 7.8% for March.(正确表达)Germany’s annual inflation rate is expected to come in at 7.3% for March.(T) 6. Inflation in Spain surged to 9.8%, the highest in that country for almost 40 years.(F) 7. Nvidia’s proposed $66bn acquisition of the British chip designer collapsed recently because of competition concerns.(正确表达)Nvidia’s proposed $60bn acquisition of the British chip designer collapsed recently because of competition concerns.(T) 8. Tesla announced its intention to split its stock, though it didn’t say when and what the ratio would be.(封面图片来源于摄图网,版权归摄图网所有)

练习 | 不要总当老好人

不要总当老好人Stop Being So Nice刘立军供稿TRANSCRIPTIt’s natural and beautiful to strive to be a nice person. In a world full of cruelty and thoughtlessness, nice people are committed to being generous, sympathetic and gentle. They never want to cause anyone to feel defeated or to lose sleep. They will go to great lengths to spare others tears. It sounds especially lovely.Nevertheless, it seems impossible to go through the whole of life being nothing but kind. Sooner or later, we are all called upon to take decisions that, even as they protect things we very much care about, will ruffle feathers, generate upset and may lead us to be (at least for a time) violently hated in some quarters.We might, for example, have to tell a romantic partner that, in spite of our deep affection for them, we don’t see ourselves being together for the long term. Or we might have to tell a child that it’s now bedtime and that there can be no more stories. Or we might have to explain to a colleague that we don’t see them fitting into a team and that they might be better off looking for opportunities elsewhere.Such situations can be agony for committedly ‘nice’ people. There are great temptations to delay the moment of truth or avoid it altogether. The ‘nice’ still deep down hope that they might - while always smiling and agreeing - stay friends with everyone. Their distinctive sensitivity has often have been fostered by childhoods in which the consequences of being honest and forthright were especially difficult. They might have had a parent who flew into a rage or threatened suicide whenever an awkward idea was laid before them - perfect preparation for an adulthood in which there appears to be no option but to tell everyone what they want to hear.However, being truly nice involves something ‘nicer’ than constant agreement and emollience. It means signalling to others what one’s value system is and sticking by it, even at the occasional cost of public opposition. It means taking on the burden of telling others where we stand and ruining their afternoon or month in order to save their long-term future and our own. It means accepting that there might be choices to be made between loyalty and sincerity and effectiveness and bonhomie.Mature people have come to terms with the tragic need to acquire something even more important than popularity: a character.VOCABULARY1. ruffle v. to make sb. annoyed, worried or upset 搅扰;激怒;使沮丧;使担心2. agony n. extreme physical or mental pain (精神或肉体的)极度痛苦3. forthright adj. direct and honest in manner and speech 直率的;直截了当的;坦诚的4. emollience n. 软化作用5. bonhomie n. (不可数名词)(from French, formal) a feeling of cheerful friendship 欢快友好的感觉;欢乐的友情QUESTIONSRead the passage. Then listen to the news and fill in the blanks with the information (words, phrases or sentences) you hear.It’s natural and beautiful to strive to be a nice person. In a world full of (Q1) ________________, nice people are committed to being generous, sympathetic and gentle. They never want to cause anyone to (Q2) ______________ or to lose sleep. They will go to great lengths to spare others tears. It sounds especially lovely.Nevertheless, it seems impossible to go through the whole of life being nothing but kind. Sooner or later, we are all called upon to take decisions that, even as they protect things we very much care about, will ruffle feathers, generate (Q3) __________ and may lead us to be (at least for a time) violently hated in some quarters.We might, for example, have to tell a romantic partner that, in spite of our deep affection for them, we don’t see ourselves being together for the long term. Or we might have to tell a child that it’s now bedtime and that there can be no more stories. Or we might have to explain to a (Q4) ________ that we don’t see them fitting into a team and that they might be better off looking for opportunities elsewhere.Such situations can be (Q5) ____________ for committedly ‘nice’ people. There are great temptations to delay the moment of truth or avoid it altogether. The ‘nice’ still deep down hope that they might - while always smiling and agreeing - stay friends with everyone. Their distinctive sensitivity has often have been fostered by childhoods in which the consequences of being (Q6) ________________ were especially difficult. They might have had a parent who flew into a rage or threatened suicide whenever an (Q7) __________ idea was laid before them - perfect preparation for an adulthood in which there appears to be no option but to tell everyone what they want to hear.However, being truly nice involves something ‘nicer’ than constant agreement and emollience. It means signalling to others what one’s value system is and sticking by it, even at the occasional cost of (Q8) ____________________. It means taking on the burden of telling others where we stand and ruining their afternoon or month in order to save their long-term future and our own. It means accepting that there might be choices to be made between (Q9) __________________ and effectiveness and bonhomie.Mature people have come to terms with the tragic need to acquire something even more important than (Q10) _______________: a character.KEYRead the passage. Then listen to the news and fill in the blanks with the information (words, phrases or sentences) you hear.It’s natural and beautiful to strive to be a nice person. In a world full of (Q1) cruelty and thoughtlessness, nice people are committed to being generous, sympathetic and gentle. They never want to cause anyone to (Q2) feel defeated or to lose sleep. They will go to great lengths to spare others tears. It sounds especially lovely.Nevertheless, it seems impossible to go through the whole of life being nothing but kind. Sooner or later, we are all called upon to take decisions that, even as they protect things we very much care about, will ruffle feathers, generate (Q3) upset and may lead us to be (at least for a time) violently hated in some quarters.We might, for example, have to tell a romantic partner that, in spite of our deep affection for them, we don’t see ourselves being together for the long term. Or we might have to tell a child that it’s now bedtime and that there can be no more stories. Or we might have to explain to a (Q4) colleague that we don’t see them fitting into a team and that they might be better off looking for opportunities elsewhere.Such situations can be (Q5) agony for committedly ‘nice’ people. There are great temptations to delay the moment of truth or avoid it altogether. The ‘nice’ still deep down hope that they might - while always smiling and agreeing - stay friends with everyone. Their distinctive sensitivity has often have been fostered by childhoods in which the consequences of being (Q6) honest and forthright were especially difficult. They might have had a parent who flew into a rage or threatened suicide whenever an (Q7) awkward idea was laid before them - perfect preparation for an adulthood in which there appears to be no option but to tell everyone what they want to hear.However, being truly nice involves something ‘nicer’ than constant agreement and emollience. It means signalling to others what one’s value system is and sticking by it, even at the occasional cost of (Q8) public opposition. It means taking on the burden of telling others where we stand and ruining their afternoon or month in order to save their long-term future and our own. It means accepting that there might be choices to be made between (Q9) loyalty and sincerity and effectiveness and bonhomie.Mature people have come to terms with the tragic need to acquire something even more important than (Q10) popularity: a character.(封面图片来源于摄图网,版权归摄图网所有)

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